It’s been 18 months since I lost my husband Byron to early onset Alzheimer’s disease. I will never forget what he went through as well as what our family went through during the seven years of his illness. It changes you, and you can’t look away anymore. You want to do something.

I am not an Alzheimer’s caregiver anymore, but that was my life and identity for seven years, until a little over a year ago. Caregivers fight a daily battle for the sake of their loved ones in order to give them the best quality of life possible. Ultimately, it is a losing battle. They know…

A year ago today, Byron got to see his Lord face-to-face for the first time.

We rarely think about the gift of life until we have a close call of some sort. It is usually at that moment we start being more thankful for our many blessings, of which being alive is the main one. A close call can re-awaken us to the fact that every day we wake up is an “extra day” that we were not promised.

I’m loving this beautiful spring weather. It’s a bittersweet time for me, though, because at this time last year I didn’t know my husband Byron would only have about six weeks left. He had declined quite a bit during the previous year, but he could still do things like walk, dance, and talk …

Today, January 15th, is our 42nd wedding anniversary. I am remembering with tears and thanksgiving the love and times Byron and I shared. Living life with him was nothing short of a grand adventure. I am also remembering how he showed his children, and all of us, the way to live and die with…

Getting through the first holiday season without your loved one is difficult. People begin warning you of this in October, and start checking on your status in November. (I can’t tell you when the status-checking ends, because it hasn’t yet.) But I’m not complaining. It would be much harder …

It’s been four months since Byron died. There is never a day that I don’t think about and miss him terribly. It is a season of uncertainty and grief. But more and more, the memories are making me smile instead of cry, and for that I am grateful.

I kept watch in Byron’s room two nights while his soul was preparing to leave his body. A mockingbird outside of his window carried on a cheerful concert long into both nights. It comforted me because I knew it was no coincidence. The mockingbird’s song reminded me there was joy even in the …

2017 was a difficult year for us. The hardest thing turned out to also be the biggest blessing: Byron's transition to Memory Care at Buckner Westminster Place seven months ago now. There was another hard thing that happened about the same time. I mostly kept it to myself because it made the …