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Pancakes are one of my daughter’s favorite breakfasts, and at 16 she is old enough and skilled enough to whip up a batch for herself. But she won’t bother unless there is a pancake mix she can use. Sigh.

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I make and eat a lot of soup in the winter. More often than I want to, I will bust open a carton of store-bought broth. Sometimes the time and effort of making the soup itself is all I can handle. It’s not that making broth is difficult. But it does require more forethought (and refrigerator…

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Sometimes I get the feeling that too many people eat black-eyed peas annually — on New Year’s Day. While I love the Southern tradition of black-eyed peas and rice (hoppin’ John), often eaten with greens, I’m here to say that black-eyed peas deserve a place in your repertoire the rest of the …

The accompanying recipes, starting with this honey-glazed salmon, each are designed to address a specific habit that can help you make a shift toward eating better in a way that is so simple and pleasurable that it will feel good to go there.

After you’ve been sitting awhile, it feels good to stand. Eventually your body aches to unfurl from the chair: Your muscles announce what they need loud and clear. It works on the flip side, too; when you’ve been standing for hours, your feet bark for a break.

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The frittata di riso may have been born of Italians’ ability to repurpose leftovers in admirable ways, but in this recipe you’ll cook arborio rice so the grains are plump and moist. As it happens, using fresh rice makes for a soft and tender omelet that has just a bit more body to it than if…

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Maybe you are one of the hundreds of thousands of people not getting your paycheck, thanks to the government shutdown. Maybe you feel squeezed after a holiday spending frenzy, or you’ve been watching the stock market the past few weeks and are worried about your 401(k). Right about now, a lo…

Of all 52 weeks of the year, this is the one with which I have a love/hate relationship. Thinking of the joyous times (weddings, births, new friends, new jobs) brings happy thoughts. On the other side are the losses, problems and disasters of the year past. The death of someone close to us l…

I get asked all the time: What exactly is a nightcap, anyway? As the author of a new book on the topic, my standard response is that it’s your last drink of the evening — it’s the pour that caps off your night.

In my make-believe world of sandwich poker, I offer the following hierarchy: A warm sandwich beats a pair of cold ones. Steak as filling, when cooked properly, ranks right up there with one-eyed jacks. And when a nutritional analysis for the whole thing manages to stay within the healthful z…

Have you ever felt overshadowed, your hard work, talents and range going unnoticed while some more ostentatious soul gets promoted, awarded or otherwise heaved into the spotlight? I have. And I’m not alone. Celery, my favorite winter vegetable, also knows the feeling.

It’s rush-hour on Phu Quoc Island’s Duong Dong River as Cuong Pham’s craft navigates diesel-belching fishing boats coming in from the sea with their overnight catch of anchovies piled high on decks. The Vietnamese-American and former Apple engineer, who fled his homeland on a boat decades ea…

In the past few weeks we have talked about party foods, vegetables and desserts for Christmas dinner, but what happens after packages are opened and the house is knee-deep in wrapping detritus? (That basically means the remnants or debris left behind. I have been waiting 48 years to use that word!)

We have been focusing on party foods for the past two weeks. I think it is time we talk about Christmas dinner. Today I am sharing vegetable recipes to complement the main dish. I recently was served a carrot dish that I think even people who do not like carrots would enjoy.

I’m the kind of person who orders takeout just to satisfy a craving for soup. As much as I love the drunken noodles and curry of our favorite local Thai spot, what really scratches the itch when I want something sour and spicy is a hot bowl of Tom Yum Gai.

When someone offers to bring a casserole to a party, I’ll admit to conjuring weary images of canned soup and mushy vegetables. Yet because that sort of dish is a perfectly sensible solution when feeding a crowd, instead, I invite casserole’s Italian cousin, the strata.

If you are a person with texture issues — meaning, you do not generally enjoy mushy foods — then getting through a bowl of oatmeal presents a challenge. Being generous with crunchy and chewy toppings helps; using steel-cut rather than rolled is another way to add bite. But if you’re also a p…

Do I need to remind you to look at the top of this newspaper to see the date and to know that Christmas is a mere 20 days away? Don’t ask me — I do not know how the time flew by so quickly.

Making holiday cookies can bring joy and happiness — unless it doesn’t. If you bake only a few times a year or think you’re missing “the baking gene,” consult these alphabetically ordered tips. Then check out The Post’s Holiday Cookie Generator (www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/food/holiday-c…

The world of cookies is a wonderful and wide-ranging place. In a decade-plus of publishing holiday cookie packages, The Washington Post’s Food section alone has shared more than 300 recipes. We have options for almost any taste, diet and ingredient, inspired by a globe’s worth of flavors.

For the foodie on your holiday list — or just people who might appreciate a good tequila or pie pan — we offer a gift guide. It’s got coffee machines, books, chocolate truffles and a fabulous tote to carry it all away.

Beautifully braided, rich, and lightly sweet, freshly baked challah is delicious on its own or smeared with softened butter. After a few days, it’s great dunked in custard and made into French toast for a decadent breakfast.

Most glazed roast chicken recipes offer some variation on these instructions: Roast a chicken as you would normally, painting on a sweet glaze 15 to 30 minutes before the bird is done.

Also known as posole, this fragrant and spicy New Mexican stew combines toothsome hominy and tender chunks of pork in a mildly spicy, verdant base. We wanted to use the multicooker to make a streamlined version that would maintain the stew’s characteristically complex flavor.

Well, it’s here — Thanksgiving Day, 2018. It seems like just yesterday that we were hoping the turkey was properly thawed, and that all the supplies were in place to put a feast on the table.

Thanksgiving is a time of gratitude for our friends and family, for life events — and for food. Lots of food. We Americans will more than double our daily caloric intake in the name of Thanksgiving tradition. But while the turkey and trimmings, heaps of mashed potatoes and thick slices of pi…

It’s finally here after all this time. Each year I give you an autumn leaves alert because I love so much the beautiful fall colors. The 14 years that I was gone from East Texas, I had to depend on Jeanie Folzenlogen for my annual report, and now, she still retains the title of Autumn Leaves…

Even though we have finished trick or treating (with most of our candy still here since it was such a bad-weather night), we really have less time than usual to get our Thanksgiving plans made. We must admit that thinking about our Thanksgiving Dinner does take some shopping, planning and pr…

The cookbooks come on strong this time of year. Boldface names in the food world — Nigella, Ina, Ottolenghi, Redzepi, Solomonov and Teigen among them — will prompt legions to hit the checkout button. But the dozens of titles swamping food editors’ inboxes and the ones that may generate the b…